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daxjustin

Smartphone Photography Workshop: Radium, BC

By SMARTPHONE PHOTOGRAPHY No Comments

Join me this November at the Headbanger Festival in Radium, BC where I’ll be teaching a smartphone photography workshop. Purchase Tickets For The Workshop Now

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This photo workshop will be held at the Bighorn Meadows Resort Welcome Centre. The day-long workshop will begin indoors with tips and tricks on how to SHOOT, PRODUCE & SHARE professional-level photos – all with your smartphone. This will include a variety of topics such as composition, best shooting practices on your mobile device, producing and editing the photos, and how to crop your images to enhance the subject and overall “presence” of a photo. After lunch, participants will head out into the field for a photo-safari to gather images to work on in the afternoon.

Registration & Information:

Cost for the workshop is $30 and can be purchased here: Buy Tickets for Dax Justin’s Smartphone Photography Workshop

When: Nov. 4, 10 a.m. – 2:45 p.m.

Where: Bighorn Meadows Resort Welcome Centre.

Register: Friday evening at meet and greet at the Village Country Inn. Or pick up a registration package before 10 a.m. at the Best Western.
Register for the Headbanger Festival here.

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
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INTO EARTH’S WOMB

By EXPERIENCE No Comments

I’ve always wondered what the Earth looks like below the surface. After my exploration of Rat’s Nest Cave with Canmore Cave Tours, I’m excited to share the photographs and stories with you. In the cave you’re immersed in a living, sweating, self-sustaining eco-system. All without a lick of sunlight. It was thrilling, educational, and visceral.

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I want to take you deep inside Earth’s Womb and show you why this is a Signature Canadian Experience as designated by Destination Canada.

A few weeks ago my latest assignment had me descending hundreds of feet into the Earth, as part of a 3-person team including my renegade manager Larissa Roque and our guide, Max. Our idea was to rappel into the fault line that created Lake Minnewanka and explore this subterranean realm, facilitated by the cavers at Canmore Cave Tours. Located just an hour and ten minutes away from Calgary near Canmore, Alberta is the Rat’s Nest Cave: a Provincial Historic Resource situated on the south-facing slope of Grotto Mountain. YO, let me be clear – I’m uneasy and scared sh*tless of the thought of crawling into tiny cracks and squeezing through tunnels hundreds of feet below the Earth. Being wedged between rocks – Are you nuts or what? But something happened down there. Time stopped; and we descended into Earth’s womb.

The first memorable instance from this journey came immediately upon entering the cave –  I looked down into a deep dark hole, fully harnessed at this stage and realized: there’s no one else down there whatsoever. This is the back country. I felt slightly nervous not knowing what to expect. Before the initial descent, our guide Max pointed out a drawing just inside the entrance of the cave. A reddish-colored marking at eye-level held my attention for the next few moments…the drawing was of a person holding a wheel. After historical research it was discovered the pictograph was of a Shaman – a protector of a spiritual place. It was a belief that this cave was the entrance to the “heart of the land.”

We entered the first room, appropriately named The Bone Yard – a room of skeletal remains of deer and paleontological specimens of birds, snakes, fish and several amphibians.  An accumulation of bones populated this room from a variety of sources such as animals falling into the cave, rats bringing in bones, but there’s also evidence of First Nations cultures visiting the cave as artifact discoveries have been made of arrowheads as well as bones shaped out with carving tools. The cave also contains the remains of over 30 mammalian species. The many and varied paleontological resources of the cave exist alongside the diversity of insects, arachnids and worms that presently inhabit the site. The human presence in the cave has been established by the discovery of prehistoric tools found at the site that date back roughly 3000 years ago. These are the reasons why this cave is a provincial protected resource. It’s safe to say that set the tone for our journey.

When you enter the cave, you enter a whole other world. It didn’t feel like we were under the surface – it felt like another planet entirely – an alien planet that was ALIVE. A rare place that thrives without the assistance of the one thing we all think every living thing needs to survive – the Sun. After we left The Bone Yard we rappelled down about 60 feet into another area of the cave, exploring throughout on mostly our hands and knees, or just flat-out on our back and stomach.

Then we came up to a newly-excavated, unnamed squeeze not yet on the map. Traditionally, a professional “mapper” carries out mapping of the area, which is conducted over time. Once the area is fully mapped, the mapper will give the newly-discovered area a name, but I suggested to Max we name that squeeze The Slayer (if you know anything about me, you’ll get the reference). I think it was meant to be – this was the tightest squeeze to shimmy through up to that point and the day before we explored Rat’s Nest also happened to be International Day of Slayer. And to reiterate – I WAS AFRAID OF GETTING STUCK. Who wouldn’t be? But it’s extremely rare. Even if a squeeze is tight, it’s easily maneuverable and this fear of mine disappeared almost instantly down there.

In my initial research of Rat’s Nest Cave I read about one of the cave’s main features: The Laundry Chute. Accurately named, The Laundry Chute is a vertical crawl down, then a sharp horizontal crawl, or shimmy, that requires you to shift your body down a tight tunnel that takes on an “L” shape. It takes approximately 2 minutes to complete this tight squeeze and it was worth every second. I can say I was looking forward to this squeeze the most and it didn’t disappoint.

We made our way through chutes and squeezes to a large room called the Grand Gallery. Being the largest room in the cave, you’ll hear the sounds of Earth… I remember staring straight up at the long fault line that leads all the way to Lake Minnewanka thinking, “These two chunks of the Earth formed the cave I’m standing in, shaped by pressure and time.” Max then told us that this fault line leads all the way to Lake Minnewanka in Banff National Park, and the water that formed this cave is now the water in Lake Minnewanka.

For the first time in my life I saw alien-like formations. I don’t just mean these things “look” like fossils – they look and feel extraterrestrial. You’re surrounded by speleological features called stalactites and stalagmites; a natural phenomena basically made up of fossilized water and gas, shaped by moisture seeping through the cave’s ceiling and dripping on a vertical line. These formations can take thousands of years to grow, depending on how much moisture comes through the cave’s wall. I don’t believe I’ve ever been surrounded by such an ambient, otherworldly place. To say the cave isn’t alive is a lie. The mountain SWEATS all around you…it’s its own living ecosystem. At one point Larissa and I were both photographing the some of these formations, affectionately referred to as Pig’s Ears and as she lay on her back taking photos, a drop of water from one of these stalactites landed in her eye. It sounds like a mundane thing to bring up, but when you’re down there, all your senses come to life and everything has meaning.

“I watched that drop come down into my eye in slow motion,” Larissa said. “People tend to blink when something’s coming at their eye, but I literally watched it happen. It didn’t feel as it should have – intrusive – and it wasn’t something I wanted to wipe off my face immediately after either. I welcomed it. It was as if that cave wanted to be part of me as much as I wanted to be part of it and with pin-point accuracy, the cave entered my body through my eye. It runs through my veins now, it’s part of me. It was one of the most peaceful moments of true connection I’ve experienced in my life.” – Larissa Roque (@larissarpr) TWEET THIS

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Alien Time Machine: This photo of interconnected “curtains” was captured within the Grotto of the cave, having grown for roughly 750,000 years. The cavers call it a ‘Pig’s Ear‘ and it develops whenever the glaciers above the cave retreat, and the now unfrozen water percolates through the rock above the cave, dissolving minerals from the surface and depositing them anew when the water reaches the cave below.

When I gently ran my fingers along this specimen, it felt like a fossilized life form. It looked intangible, yet existed right before my eyes. Cold, hard, smooth and extraterrestrial. It FELT alive. And so did I.

At the deepest point in the exploration of Rat’s Nest at -54 meters, we decided to kill our headlamps inside The Grotto Pool, the lowest room on the tour (FYI: The lowest point in the cave is -165 meters). It’s a strange feeling to wave your hands in front of your face and only experience pure blackness. You. See. Nothing. You will FEEL the darkness. Lights off – minds clear. With nothing to see with your eyes, my thoughts and feelings turned inward. I discovered I wasn’t claustrophobic. You know the first time I met Adam, Owner & Facilitator at Canmore Cave Tours, he said, “This is not a ‘tour.’ It’s deeper than that…we’re in the business of showing people a side of themselves they may have not known they had. You’ll discover something about yourself you may have never known.

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“Like studying layers in glaciers or the lines of tree rings, studying those layers in the cave formations tells you about the past. Oxygen isotopes trapped within (giving information of temperature and glaciation), along with proportions of greenhouse gases (giving us information about climate), and trapped organics (telling us about the ecology outside), all work together to paint a picture of the world long before homo sapiens even walked the planet.”

Max, Guide at Canmore Cave Tours

We discovered the ultimate sense of solitude as we explored 4 kilometers of a subterranean world. Larissa and I learned how paleoclimatology (the study of time through climate) gives us windows into past worlds and after spending roughly 5 hours underground, being in this cave felt like entering a living time machine. You won’t notice the time fly by while you’re down there, it felt like time stopped. This is a visceral and thrilling experience and I now understand why it’s a Signature Canadian Experience as designated by Destination Canada.

As I write this I’m staring down at hundreds-of-thousands-of-years-old sediment underneath my fingernails and without being on a Private Tour – SOLITUDE – Canmore Cave Tour’s new experience offering – I don’t feel we would have been able to fully absorb the magnitude of this experience. Without being with a group of people, you’ll have time to enjoy every inch of the cave while exploring at your own pace.

 

What: A Signature Canadian Experience as designated by Destination Canada.

Where: Rat’s Nest Cave, designated a Provincial Historic Site in 1987, situated on the south-facing slope of Grotto Mountain near Canmore, AB, Canada. Access to the cave is restricted in order to protect the environment inside and entry is facilitated by Canmore Cave Tours.

How: Connect with the Team at Canmore Cave Tours:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/canmorecavetours
Twitter: www.twitter.com/canmorecavetour
Instagram: www.instagram.com/canmorecavetours

Web: canmorecavetours.com

Toll Free: 1877.317.1178

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Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
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Published in CanGeo’s 150 Ultimate Canadian Instagram Photos Book

By ANNOUNCEMENT No Comments

Excited to announce a photo of mine has been selected by Canadian Geographic for publication in their Canada 150 Instagram Book! I couldn’t be more excited! I mean what’s more Canadian than paddling in a vintage canoe in Canada’s first National Park? ? Thanks to everyone for supporting my passion and thank you for the selection Canadian Geographic!

 

Two Jack Lake, Banff National Park, AB, Canada

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I’m honored to share these pages with many highly-proficient photographers whom I’ve looked up to for years. Pick up a copy at select major newsstands like Chapters or Wal-Mart or online here: http://bit.ly/2rvVEnJ

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
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Photo Displayed at YYC Calgary International Airport

By ANNOUNCEMENT No Comments

My photo of iconic Moraine Lake has been chosen to welcome millions of visitors travelling from around the world to Calgary (YYC) and I couldn’t be more proud to showcase our province and country – THANK YOU! The photo is now displayed life-size in the new International Terminal at the YYC Calgary International Airport. 

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You can find the photo of Moraine Lake in the new International Terminal for the next three years!

More information →

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
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DAX JUSTIN X HELLY HANSEN

By ANNOUNCEMENT No Comments

It comes as a complete honor to proudly announce that I’m now officially supported by Helly Hansen!

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Becoming an HH Ambassador means that a (completely wild & unattainable) dream has come true, but to know that I’m partnered with a company who has been innovating in the outdoor industry since 1877 is mind-shattering to me! I’ve had Helly gear since grade 9 and I am proud to have their support. Photos: Larissa Roque

I’ve always known HH gear to be one thing: OUTLASTING. And that is what I fully intend on delivering.

 

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
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SkiBC: Radium Hot Springs

By ON ASSIGNMENT No Comments

Nothing beats a ski and soak at Radium Hot Springs

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I was pumped to head to the Purcell Mountains in southeastern B.C. It would be a fitting end to my ski B.C. ski tour. The last time I was in the area, I was way up in the sky paragliding from the summit of Panorama Mountain. I remember the rolling cliffs and spectacular views of the Rockies. It was an experience I’ll never forget. Naturally, I couldn’t wait to get back here, but this time with something much more down to earth and relaxing.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2ljZFKG

Panorama will always have a sweet spot in my heart

I have a cool connection to this place because Panorama Mountain is where I learned how to carve on my snowboard. A decade ago, I’d been snowboarding for a season and hadn’t perfected the infamous ‘carve’ yet and instead spent time catching both of my edges, and crashing. Then I went to Panorama for a weekend and on the last day of my trip I carved like the wind. I will never forget it. So, revisiting this mountain on a board again was like being back in that moment 10 years ago. But this time I also I had someone with me to make my trip memorable in a different way. His name is Karl, and I’d like you to meet him. Read more: http://bit.ly/2ljZFKG


Meet Karl

When I arrived at Panorama Mountain I met with a long-time local legend, Karl Fahrni. Karl arrived here in 1974 from Australia via Switzerland and missed the Alps. That’s when he discovered the Radium area and has never left. Karl loves hang-gliding and being on the mountain. In summer, you’ll find him hiking or fishing in the backcountry lakes. “You have to have a connection and love mother nature to live out here. It is very special.”

Karl and his daughter Karen skied with me for the day and I learned just how much this place means to them. Karen was born and raised in the Radium area, but went to school in Calgary then travelled the world for a year. Then she returned to her hometown. “I keep getting drawn back here, I love being with my dad in the outdoors. He … taught me the essence of hard work. I have no regrets.” Read more: http://bit.ly/2ljZFKG


Soak it all in while surrounded by winter’s icy beauty

An overwhelming sense of relaxation surrounded me as I entered the Radium Hot Springs. The pools are a comfy 39 C, and people speak in hushed tones knowing this is where we all come to chill out. But as a landscape photographer, I was struck by beauty of the ice and snow encrusting the trees, creating magical ice sculptures surrounding the hot springs. Read more: http://bit.ly/2ljZFKG

 

Meet a “headbanger”

After leaving the hot pools, I was wondering if I was going to get chance to meet the local wildlife, the big horn sheep, known as ‘headbangers. Karl told me stories of these curious yet protective creatures, known very well to the locals. They get the name for their fall mating ritual, in which they literally butt heads to see which will win the mate of their choice. They roam the hills – and even the streets – making themselves one of the highlights of visiting this area. As if they knew I wanted to photograph them, they appeared on the side of hill, off the main highway. I pulled into a rest area, jumped out of the car with my camera and began shooting. I had their attention now, and these not-so-shy creatures seemed to love modelling for me.

I can honestly say I found physical and emotional exhilaration in Radium. Chilling out in the steamy hot pools and then having the local wildlife pose for me; it just doesn’t get better than that. Read more: http://bit.ly/2ljZFKG

 

Read the full storyhttp://bit.ly/2ljZFKG

For more information on our journey visit: http://bit.ly/2lAOb2l and follow the expedition on my Instagram and Facebook pages! x

Partners: SnowSeekers – Tourism Northern BC

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
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SkiBC: Kimberley Alpine Resort

By ON ASSIGNMENT No Comments

Kimberley isn’t just for families, it’s for powder enthusiasts and explorers, too

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Kimberley Alpine Resort is well known as a family oriented ski hill, so naturally I didn’t anticipate anything too crazy. It seems my perceptions of places get completely altered when I visit, because once I start talking to people they shape the identity of these places in unique ways.

After skiing with the locals, I discovered terrain for all levels, a friendly vibe and, also found out, that although this place is super family friendly, it’s not just for families.

Kimberley’s nickname might give you a clue about the place – ‘The Bavarian City of the Rockies,’ – but that certainly wouldn’t be telling the whole story. As always, you need to scratch the surface when you’re checking out a new place. With a population of 7,600 and loads of winter sport activities, I’d spent some time exploring the Purcell Mountains and Columbia Valley region, but Kimberley was new to me.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2lXKBQ4

Myth-busting Kimberley

I came here to do a bit of myth-busting about the fact that Kimberley isn’t just a family mountain. Sure, it’s got something for all kinds of activities for outdoorsy families, but what I found out is that Kimberley is more like a community mountain – for all ages.

I was struck by the fact that there appears to be no age gap. People seem supportive of all ages. I saw young kids who looked up to the “cool teenagers” and 30-year-olds, with lots of encouragement between everyone. I didn’t see any judgment, just people having a good time together doing what they love. To me, that’s priceless. Read more:  http://bit.ly/2lXKBQ4


Meet Steve

Steve Black is 100 per cent in love with anything alpine. He and skiing are totally dating – in fact he has been downhill skiing for 77 months straight without missing a month!

He works in the pro shop at Kimberley. I’ve now discovered this is where the locals share stories of powder and pleasure. And, they all know their way around all kinds of terrain. Steve grew up here and although he has visited other places and hills, there’s no way he will leave this mountain. He and a small clan of renegade powder-heads have invested countless hours creating a huge gathering area around one of the runs. It’s been dubbed “The Pit.” It’s like this cool outdoor snow patio, that can fit up to 200 people. Some years the walls have been 10 feet high. It is the place to relax and hang out with like-minded ski enthusiasts when they’re skiing Kimberley. Read more:  http://bit.ly/2lXKBQ4


A hill for explorers

After skiing the mountain with Steve, I found out how this entire area is ripe for exploration and discovery. Ski the mountain and you’ll find new terrain all day. Or, throw your skis on your back and go on a search for untouched, deep powder. That’s what Steve taught me. Even though he’s been here for a long time, he can still go and find new gnarly terrain to shred.

One thing I learned is that just one day at Kimberley is not enough. If you’re lucky enough to visit, be sure to ask Steve to take you up to ‘The Pit.’ Read more:  http://bit.ly/2lXKBQ4

 

Read the full storyhttp://bit.ly/2lXKBQ4

For more information on our journey visit: http://bit.ly/2lAOb2l and follow the expedition on my Instagram and Facebook pages! x

Partners: SnowSeekers – Tourism Northern BC

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
Instagram
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SkiBC: Sun Peaks Resort

By ON ASSIGNMENT No Comments

Steal away to this village for unexpected moments

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My first visit to Sun Peaks, Canada’s second largest ski area was one of the coolest experiences I’ve ever had, and for reasons you would never expect.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2keSDI1

Meet ‘Red’

I had one of the most beautiful experiences of my life here. I came face-to-face with a wild red fox on my very first run down the mountain. We carefully and cautiously approached the animal which I named ‘Red.’ I was in sheer amazement the entire time. I can’t explain the feeling, but I couldn’t look away because I felt connected to something real and alive. Thank you Red, for bringing a tear to my eye when I least expected it. Read more: http://bit.ly/2keSDI1


Live, eat and breathe alpine culture

Deep steeps, long cruisers, gladed areas, powder stashes and corduroy groomers can all be found within this 4,270 acres of terrain. Three mountains surround a European-style, ski-through village filled with quaint shops, cafes and eateries. Sun Peaks has so many activities and events on and off the slopes. You’ll be left wishing you had for more time to spend here. Each mountain is easily accessible from the village, so it’s easy to ski all three peaks in the same day. Or, stick to the area that you love the most. Sun Peaks gets, on average, six metres of snow annually, and is blessed with light, dry powder conditions. Sun Peaks is more than a ski resort, it’s also a vibrant mountain resort municipality with no shortage of passionate and involved local residents who commit countless hours of volunteer time in dozens of community groups, clubs, and associations. Read more: http://bit.ly/2keSDI1


Meet Nancy

Who would ever expect to meet a Canadian ski legend skiing at a resort? Not me, but that’s exactly what happened. Unfortunately, I met Nancy Greene (also a Canadian senator!) on my last day at Sun Peaks, and for only a short time. In the 10 minutes or so we spent talking, I was impressed by her love, passion and commitment to the sport of skiing and ski racing. Nancy is known for a long list of achievements – she was Canada’s top ski racer through the 1960s, winning gold and silver medals at the 1968 Grenoble Olympics and overall World Cup titles in 1967 and 68. Read more: http://bit.ly/2keSDI1

 

Meet ‘Koach’

Kent ‘Koach’ Thiessen, is a Kamloops local who calls the mountains of Sun Peaks his home. Koach likes his powder deep and is always sporting a mile-wide smile. “Sun Peaks is one of the funnest hills to ride and the community welcomed us with open arms in 1995 when we came here to start Oronge Boardshop.” Since he and his business partner opened the doors, they’ve been involved in the community and have been spreading the spirit of snow-loving sports. Read more: http://bit.ly/2keSDI1

 

Read the full storyhttp://bit.ly/2keSDI1

For more information on our journey visit: http://bit.ly/2lAOb2l and follow the expedition on my Instagram and Facebook pages! x

Partners: SnowSeekers – Tourism Northern BC

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook Page

SkiBC: Big White Mountain

By ON ASSIGNMENT No Comments

Shredding the slopes and meeting new friends amid Big White’s snow ghosts

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I’d heard that Big White Ski Resort was known for having the ‘Best Snow in North America”, well at least according to the readers of Conde Nast Traveler. That’s a pretty big statement, so I set out to see for myself what makes this place a powder heaven.

 

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2lCdvGg

Snow ghosts like I’ve never seen before

I didn’t even know what a “snow ghost” was until about half-way up the chairlift at Big White Mountain Resort. You know how you see some trees dusted in snow and it looks spectacular? At Big White I saw for the first time trees completely draped in snow. Fields of them. I couldn’t help but take lots of pictures to document these beautiful yet somewhat haunting creations. To me, snow ghosts are the signature of Big White. Read more: http://bit.ly/2lCdvGg


The bad-ass ‘Bluebirds of Big White’

I expected that when I met up with Kelowna local Jeff Willard to snowboard for the day, it would be a nice and casual afternoon. Instead, on the first run he sprayed me with powder as he flew above my head! The rest of his renegade crew, consisting of six boarders, showed up and wowed me with their spectacular jumps. They made my day and my first time photographing and doing video of snowboarders. I’ve coined them the “Bluebirds of Big White.” These people really know how to shred it up on the slopes. But what made it even more spectacular was perfect bluebird conditions all day with snow that exceeded all expectations. Read more: http://bit.ly/2lCdvGg


Challenge your body and mind on the ice climbing tower

After a day on the hill, I still had enough energy to check out another cool feature of Big White – the ice tower. Within the Adventure Park at Big White is a 60-foot tower constructed of four telephone poles with three-foot thick ice, that gleams in the sunshine.

This was my first-time ice climbing, so I needed to be shown the ropes. Half way up I got the photo I was looking for – and I was totally ready to come down. Being that high up on ice is a strange feeling, and using the tools, not to mention trusting them, was intense. “Ready to come down!” I yelled. I was out of my comfort zone and this is when the amazing Amber and Neil, who work as guides in the adventure park, told me, “GET UP THERE! YOU CAN DO IT MAN!” Their encouragement kept me going, giving me confidence. From that point on, my climbing tools somehow gripped the ice and I felt I could really do this. I dug in hard and pulled myself up and moments later I was near the top. Hell yeah! I saw the cowbell and I rang it furiously. I overcame my fears and dug in to conquer my body and mind. I’ll never forget this experience. Read more: http://bit.ly/2lCdvGg

Read the full storyhttp://bit.ly/2lCdvGg

For more information on our journey visit: http://bit.ly/2lAOb2l and follow the expedition on my Instagram and Facebook pages! x

Partners: SnowSeekers – Tourism Northern BC

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook Page

SkiNorthBC: Troll Mountain

By EXPEDITION No Comments

Troll Resort steals my heart with fresh snow and friendly people

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When I heard I was going to ski a mountain resort mysteriously named “‘Troll,” I knew this place was somehow different from the other ski hills. It became my mission to find out what made it so unique.

As the story goes, a man named Lars Fossberg and his wife Astrid built this place from the ground up in 1972. It’s no wonder Troll has pretty deep roots in the Quesnel region. To this day, the resort is still run by the family. Lars’ daughter Hildur and her husband Lars Sinclair, operate the hill that has 527 metres (1,729 feet) of vertical and reportedly, the world’s second largest T-bar. It’s always so cool to find out facts like this!

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2lCp7ZA

Meet Hildur

Hildur Sinclair was the first person to greet me at Troll as I walked in but I was also greeted by smiles and a warmth of this tight-knit community.

“What we do is create joy for people…create a space for them to come and experience joy,” Hildur tells me. “Troll is a special place in a lot of people’s hearts and it’s where they have a lot of fun, laugh and play. I think that’s super important nowadays – to be able to get out and just experience nature and fall in the snow and you’re not plugged into anything. That’s what we do here.” I couldn’t agree more. Read more: http://bit.ly/2lCp7ZA

A hill full of life

I instantly noticed the connection between people and the mountain. The collective passion for getting people and kids on snow was one of the highlights of my trip. And about that name ‘Troll’? Originally it was Hildur’s aunt who suggested the name to Lars. In traditional Norwegian and Scandinavian folklore, the Troll is a mystical and mythological creature. Lars loved the idea of calling the resort Troll. For Hildur, it fits the ski hill’s philosophy that skiing should evoke be fun and put a little magic in every day. Read more: http://bit.ly/2lCp7ZA

Meet Beat

You might “know” Beat from the TV series Timber Kings. I was fortunate enough to get to meet him face to face and ski some fresh lines with him. Riding up the T-bar with Baet, we struck up a conversation and I asked him why he loves Troll and what he’d miss if he had to leave.

“You wouldn’t get me out of this place. I would miss the people the most, as well as the ability to completely disconnect. Here. I can truly disconnect from the world and the internet and even cell service is tough. That is what I love. I love what I do and I love the people surrounding me and this is a small community we all love to call home.” Read more: http://bit.ly/2lCp7ZA

To the people of Troll Mountain, you have my heart. XO

 

Read the full storyhttp://bit.ly/2lCp7ZA

For more information on our journey visit: http://bit.ly/2lAOb2l and follow the expedition on my Instagram and Facebook pages! x

Partners: SnowSeekers – Tourism Northern BC

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook Page