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EXPEDITION

Life in the inter-tidal zone, Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, British Columbia, Canada

Water is the Elixir of Life

By EXPEDITION

8 min read

Kayaking in a magical marine ecosystem and becoming one with a community of paddlers, I embark on my second sea kayaking expedition with TRAK Kayaks paddling the only National Park on Vancouver Island, the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, British Columbia.

by Dax Justin

Meet the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve — a place of sacred solitude along the rugged west coast of British Columbia. The moment you enter this place you’re struck with an onrush of scenery that leaves you feeling electrically charged.

e·lix·ir
/əˈliksər/

noun
1. magical or medicinal potion.
“an elixir guaranteed to induce love”

Water is such an important part of the human experience.

The entire province of British Columbia holds a sentimental value in my heart. Defined by its rustic Pacific coastline and mountain ranges, I spent all year counting down to the moments of our family vacations in Summer to B.C. I’ve LOVED everything about this place for as long as I can remember. In my first five years as a photographer I’ve had a handful of incredible experiences across several regions in B.C., discovering the various mountainous and coastal identities of the province. 

ABOVE: Setting off from Horseshoe Bay on the ferry, crossing the Strait of Georgia to Nanaimo, marking the start of our journey.

This planet does not belong to us; we belong to her.

ABOVE: You’ll meet trees as large as life while you explore the nearby trails.

Welcome to Basecamp.

Exploring the surrounding coastal region of Wya Point in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, B.C., Canada

ABOVE: Our yurt accommodations at Wya Point sat nested within a coastal old growth spruce forest, meeting a rustic coastline.

After settling into basecamp I went out to stand on a large distinct rock where the water meets the sand. As I stood atop the rock, eyes closed, I was misted by the ocean spray as a wave of emotion flooded my stance, I BELONG HERE, said my inner dialogue. That was the first time in this holy atmosphere I paused for a moment in reverence.

ABOVE: Exploring the intertidal zone of this near-shore ecosystem.

We live on land; but we came from water. I’ve had this reality in mind since going on my first sea kayaking expedition in May of 2018. On that journey I learned that through kayaking you can harness a profound connection to water – a connection often misunderstood or under-explored. Is water some kind of magical elixir or potion for human beings?

ABOVE: TRAK ‘Pilot” Paige Olson, riding waves at Long Beach.

WATER IS SUCH AN ESSENTIAL PART THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE, AND BEING IN A KAYAK IS AN INTIMATE EXCHANGE WITH NATURE.

Enter the TRAK 2.0 Kayak

Imagine you’re in a skin-on-frame portable kayak in a remote location, you’re distancing yourself from the shore as the incoming tide raises you vertically – this is the will of the ocean. Situated in the cockpit of your TRAK 2.0 kayak, always keeping your paddle in the water, you feel wholeheartedly taken by the energetic forces of the water. You can feel them through the boat, harnessing an ultimately spiritual connection with the water. Your paddle blade grabs the water as you thrust yourself forward, rhythmic and harmonious with the tides of the sea. I mean, how else can I describe it? Actually, my fellow expedition participant Francine said it pretty well:

“This boat is like no other, it’s like it’s alive.”

— Francine Petit

Humanizing

We had 16 people on this expedition, and over five days of on-land and on-water training participants are coached by our very own TRAK Pilots. TRAK Pilots are the most enthusiastic group of people you’ll meet – these are the brand ambassadors for TRAK. They will likely be your first point of contact when you want to jump in a boat on a TRAK Discovery Day. The TRAK Pilots are experienced and certified paddlers and are specifically selected for the area and region to come educate camp participants in tandem with our expedition Guide.

I witnessed a profound change within the camp participants and saw the fear in their facial expressions turn to bravery and grit. The paddling aptitude of the participants grew rapidly and as they learned and began executing dream-like paddling strokes their fears turned into confidence and I FELT it in their faces through my camera’s zoom lens. The paddling aptitude of the participants grew rapidly and at this stage I can say I was in each and every boat alongside those people facing adversity. We all found a deep connection to water – everyone transformed.

Participants from the TRAK Kayaks Pacific Rim Skills Camp 2019

ABOVE: Participants from the TRAK Pacific Rim Kayaking Skills Camp 2019

Through my lens, I witnessed paddlers from all skill levels take on the unforgiving waves of the west coast growing in unforseeable feats of human accomplishment. Every participant accepted the challenge with alacrity.

This year I wanted to visit coastal communities and marine life that inhabits the wild Pacific coast of B.C., Canada. I began exploring the nearby areas and found myself instantly mesmerized by the vibrancy of marine life in the inter-tidal zones. This rich aquatic environment provided a home multitude of sea creatures and life.

ABOVE: We found one single red urchin among a community of purple urchins in the intertidal zone.

“When you love something, you protect it. My position and responsibility is to explore, illuminate and activate. The care for our oceans must occur as a global movement.”

Safeguarding the Seas

As a kayaker, you truly feel like you’re part of the ecosystem. We are interconnected with the living water and we depend on it – all life does. The Earth’s surface is made up of 71% water and basically as humans, so are we. My insatiable desire to explore this connection between people and water shouldn’t seem that crazy, right? Oceans provide food for billions of people on the planet, and they support 100% of life on Earth.

ABOVE: We weren’t alone! The region provides rich coastal nutrition for nearby wildlife including wolves like the Vancouver Island wolf (Canis lupus crassodon) is a subspecies of grey wolf, endemic to Vancouver Island.

By protecting delicate marine ecosystems we are also standing for the future of the oceans spellbinding inhabitants. No matter where you are in the world, the well-being and homeostasis of the ocean is reflective of our very survival as a species.

“Oceans host more than 80% of species on the planet, and they produce more than half of the world’s oxygen. Showing perspective through photography can captivate minds of all ages and help demonstrate why we need to unite against the preventable tragedy of ocean plastic and marine debris.”

ABOVE: Meet the Giant Green Anemone (Anthopleura xanthogrammica)

For every second breath…

Since oceans cover two-thirds of our planet, 50% of the oxygen on Earth is produced by our oceans – which means that EVERY SECOND BREATH we take depends on the health and well-being of this sacred water. Water is the elixir of life and it all comes down to the protection of our marine ecosystems. On the surface, a great way to start acting is to side with SeaLegacy. Founded by National Geographic Photographers, Paul Nicklen and Cristina Mittermeier, they’re on a mission to create healthy and abundant oceans, for us and for the planet. Join The Tide, a passionate community invested in the health and sustainability of our oceans, or consider a donation to create a world where our oceans are full of life.

Fact:

Canadians produce 3 MILLION TONNES of plastic each year; and then we recycle only 9% of it.

Nine percent. Are you kidding!? We need to drive this number to 90 percent. Literally. We also have the power and capacity to do it. There is no “one solution” that will get us to zero plastic waste – it will take ten thousand changes, small and large, to help us get on this path. Here’s how you can take immediate action to reduce your plastic footprint: All you have to do is visit the website 10000changes.ca, follow the “Make a Change” button, and make a commitment to changing the way you live with plastics. As an Ambassador of this program, I have made a commitment to a lifestyle free of plastic bags and refusing plastic straws. Canadian Geographic and the Royal Canadian Geographic Society in partnership with the Recycling Council of Ontario and Environment & Climate Change Canada have joined forces to re-imagine the recycling revolution with the new program 10,000 Changes.

Canadian Geographic and the Royal Canadian Geographic Society in partnership with the Recycling Council of Ontario and Environment & Climate Change Canada have joined forces to re-imagine the recycling revolution with the new program 10,000 Changes.

I believe that it’s (extremely) important that we protect our planet and serve as environmental stewards for future generations.

ABOVE:  Exploring the intertidal pools at Wya Point, Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, B.C.

The Conquest of the ‘Blue Mind’

I’m not crazy when I say there are energetic forces in the water. Dr. Wallace J. Nichols is a scientist, activist, community organizer, and author who works to inspire a deeper connection with nature. He took notice of these profound properties of water and founded the notion of the Blue Mind. I need you to discover this power. “Using our oceans as the prime example of how insignificant humans can feel while also being unmistakingly connected to the spirit of nature, Nichols urges us to embrace our natural surroundings in order to live robust and full lives.” Learn more and watch his TEDx Talk – Exploring the Blue Mind.

There’s something to say about knowing how to harness the energetic forces of water. It wasn’t just the growing capabilities of the paddlers, it was a force found in a deeper context of spiritual energy between the electrons in your body and the ions in the water. What does this all mean? You’re capable of unreasonable human achievement, when you’re in and around water.

There’s no better time to be brave.

BELOW: As the expedition came to an end, we were graced with a stunning evening in Parksville, British Columbia.

Dax Justin is a Canadian explorer and adventure photographer, currently based in Calgary, AB. His photos and stories are focused on connecting humans back to nature. His work is concerned with ocean health, Indigenous rights and distinctiveness, and our environment, covering stories such as eco-tourism in the Great Bear Rainforest, the human impact of marine debris, and trekking with Polar Bears on the Hudson Bay tundra. Dax is a newly-elected Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society (FRCGS), Contributor to Canadian Geographic, a National Geographic Certified Educator, TEDx speaker and creator of the the ‘Explore in School‘ (EiS) initiative. You can explore more of his images and adventures on instagram.com/daxjustin or facebook.com/daxjustin.

SkiNorthBC: Troll Mountain

By EXPEDITION No Comments

Troll Resort steals my heart with fresh snow and friendly people

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When I heard I was going to ski a mountain resort mysteriously named “‘Troll,” I knew this place was somehow different from the other ski hills. It became my mission to find out what made it so unique.

As the story goes, a man named Lars Fossberg and his wife Astrid built this place from the ground up in 1972. It’s no wonder Troll has pretty deep roots in the Quesnel region. To this day, the resort is still run by the family. Lars’ daughter Hildur and her husband Lars Sinclair, operate the hill that has 527 metres (1,729 feet) of vertical and reportedly, the world’s second largest T-bar. It’s always so cool to find out facts like this!

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2lCp7ZA

Meet Hildur

Hildur Sinclair was the first person to greet me at Troll as I walked in but I was also greeted by smiles and a warmth of this tight-knit community.

“What we do is create joy for people…create a space for them to come and experience joy,” Hildur tells me. “Troll is a special place in a lot of people’s hearts and it’s where they have a lot of fun, laugh and play. I think that’s super important nowadays – to be able to get out and just experience nature and fall in the snow and you’re not plugged into anything. That’s what we do here.” I couldn’t agree more. Read more: http://bit.ly/2lCp7ZA

A hill full of life

I instantly noticed the connection between people and the mountain. The collective passion for getting people and kids on snow was one of the highlights of my trip. And about that name ‘Troll’? Originally it was Hildur’s aunt who suggested the name to Lars. In traditional Norwegian and Scandinavian folklore, the Troll is a mystical and mythological creature. Lars loved the idea of calling the resort Troll. For Hildur, it fits the ski hill’s philosophy that skiing should evoke be fun and put a little magic in every day. Read more: http://bit.ly/2lCp7ZA

Meet Beat

You might “know” Beat from the TV series Timber Kings. I was fortunate enough to get to meet him face to face and ski some fresh lines with him. Riding up the T-bar with Baet, we struck up a conversation and I asked him why he loves Troll and what he’d miss if he had to leave.

“You wouldn’t get me out of this place. I would miss the people the most, as well as the ability to completely disconnect. Here. I can truly disconnect from the world and the internet and even cell service is tough. That is what I love. I love what I do and I love the people surrounding me and this is a small community we all love to call home.” Read more: http://bit.ly/2lCp7ZA

To the people of Troll Mountain, you have my heart. XO

 

Read the full storyhttp://bit.ly/2lCp7ZA

For more information on our journey visit: http://bit.ly/2lAOb2l and follow the expedition on my Instagram and Facebook pages! x

Partners: SnowSeekers – Tourism Northern BC

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook Page

SkiNorthBC: 72 Hours in Quesnel

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Discovering the Cariboo Region of British Columbia

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As we drove into the region of Quesnel I had no idea what to expect. It was my first time here, but I had I heard that it was rich in both winter outdoor activities and history. Quesnel is a small city of roughly 10,000 people (with 13,000 in the surrounding areas) and is part of the Cariboo District of British Columbia. Located nearly evenly between the cities of Prince George and Williams Lake, Quesnel acts as a central outdoor playground of the North Cariboo, offering unlimited recreational opportunities for families, adventurers and people looking to enjoy an expanse of pristine wilderness.

I spent the days exploring the region, meeting new people and trying new winter activities.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2keHI0V

A haven for winter sports: Snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, fat biking and trail running

You know what makes me extremely happy? Waking up, strapping on snowshoes, and exploring vast landscapes. This is how I first got to know Quesnel. Upon arriving at Ten Mile Lake Provincial Park I was awestruck by the rolling hills and fairy-tale winter views. The sun was rising as we were snowshoeing the trails of Quesnel. We then headed to Hallis Lake to visit and cross-country ski with the Cariboo Ski Touring Club. Formed in 1975, the CSTC was created to facilitate and further all aspects of cross-country skiing in the Quesnel area. Meeting members of the club I was struck by their passion for cross-country skiing. Read more: http://bit.ly/2keHI0V

Relax here: Barkerville Brewing Co.

Wind down from a day of winter activities at the Barkerville Brewing Co. Located in the centre of City of Quesnel, the local brewery true après spirit. Apart from an amazing array of local brews, we spent the evening sharing bites and reminiscing about our snow-filled day.

Barkerville Brewing Co. sets itself from many other breweries because it pays homage to the historic region’s mining past, telling stories through its award-winning beers. With names like 18 Karat Gold and White Gold, well you get the picture. Read more: http://bit.ly/2keHI0V

Explore History

Quesnel is located at the start of the Barkerville Highway, or Highway 26 as you might find it on the map.  Rich in mining history, Quesnel and the famed Hwy 26 pays many tributes to those who founded this region, including characters like Billy Barker. As you’ll read from Doc Pow’s story on Barkerville Barker in 1862 stuck gold in the region, so much gold, it was named one of the riches scores in gold rush history!  You’ll find Barker’s name in a few places and your time here can include a stay in the Billy Barker hotel.  It’s a unique spot to hang your hat, as it is built like a river boat, which back in the day was used to haul all kinds of goods and services up and down BC’s longest river, the Fraser that weaves is way through this region and right down into Vancouver. Read more: http://bit.ly/2keHI0V

Troll Resort full of surprises

From the instant, we arrived at Troll Resort we were greeted with open arms. It was a place I never expected to visit but it surprised me more than any other place, like meeting Hildur and Len Sinclair, who are a treasure trove of stories. Read more about Troll Resort here.

 

Read the full storyhttp://bit.ly/2keHI0V

For more information on our journey visit: http://bit.ly/2lAOb2l and follow the expedition on my Instagram and Facebook pages! x

Partners: SnowSeekers – Tourism Northern BC

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook Page

SkiNorthBC: Hudson Bay Mountain

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Hudson Bay Mountain cabin community leads an enviable life

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After witnessing and shooting one of the most stunning sunrises of my life from the peak of Hudson Bay Mountain, I was intrigued by the small mountain community I saw on my way up. It turns out there’s a handful of people who live on the mountain and whole-heartedly embraced this place.

I could instantly see why. I spent the rest of the day skiing iconic mountain lines and talking with the cabin-living locals to find out a bit more.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2lgjoLA

Meet cabin locals: Jason and family

Jason Krauskopf and his family live in a cabin on Hudson Bay Mountain and can literally jump off their back deck into a couple of metres of fresh powder. The amount of snow on this mountain is incredible and I can see why Jason’s two boys Toan and Tosh love growing up here.

Jason is the co-owner of Local Supply Co., a gear shop for outdoor enthusiasts in Smithers. You can tell he’s is woven deeply into the outdoors lifestyle of this community. Read more: http://bit.ly/2lgjoLA


Finding joy in the alpine culture

At the core of this mountain is the community. After skiing with Jason and his family, I got a chance to do a little exploring of my own. Nearly every person I talked to said they would never leave because they have a deep love for the mountain and close bonds with each other. One snowboarder told me, “You can let your kids run wild on this hill with their friends; it’s safe. All of our families look after each other.” Read more: http://bit.ly/2lgjoLA


Meet Kelly

Nearing the end of the day, I was ready to relax and enjoy the sun setting from Kelly McCormack’s cabin. We literally skied to her front door. I felt like I’d just walked into my aunt’s house because we instantly hit it off. The skies were drenched with colour and over a hot chocolate I talked to Kelly about what she loves about this mountain.

“My husband and I drove around the province and looked all over … and couldn’t find anything that spoke to us more,” she says. “We were drawn here.” Read more: http://bit.ly/2lgjoLA

 

Read the full storyhttp://bit.ly/2lgjoLA

For more information on our journey visit: http://bit.ly/2lAOb2l and follow the expedition on my Instagram and Facebook pages! x

Partners: SnowSeekers – Tourism Northern BC

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook Page

SkiNorthBC: 72 Hours in Smithers

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Three snowy days in Smithers and I’m a convert

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This leg of our SkiNorthBC expedition brought us to a little place called Smithers, located in northwestern B.C., halfway between Prince George and Prince Rupert. Smithers has a small but mighty population of just more than 5,400. I did a little digging and discovered that it was founded in 1913 and eagerly adopted a strong Alpine culture. A town bylaw even requires businesses in the downtown area to construct buildings in an Alpine style. I wanted to kick off my time in Smithers by meeting and skiing with some residents, locally nicknamed ‘Smithereens. Little did I know that I would become smitten with the town and its people. I discovered this place has the whole package, generous people and a warm alpine attitude. After spending time with the people and views of Smithers, I could easily live here permanently.

 

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2kGvjiC

 

Meet Taylor Bachrach, Canada’s powder-shredding mayor

Taylor Bachrach is not your typical mayor, but that’s probably because of where he lives. He grew up on skis and has lived here for about 12 years here with his family after falling in love with the place. “We moved here for the mountain,” Bachrach says. “My wife and I wanted to be in a mountain ski town with a great community. We felt signals from the universe that this was the place to be to raise our family. This place has a generosity of spirit like nowhere else.” Read more: http://bit.ly/2kGvjiC

Eat & drink: Aspen in the Riverhouse Lounge

You can keep your ski boots on and settle into this local institution for the warm fire, some pub fare and cold beverages after your snowy adventures. The huge menu caters to all appetites and each night has a food theme. Read more: http://bit.ly/2kGvjiC

Meet Alex Cuba

Alex Cuba is one of Smithers’ most famous residents and I had the opportunity to meet the multi-award winning musician while I was there. Aside from his music sung in English and Spanish, I learned his other big love is his family. He ended up living in Smithers after marrying his wife Sarah who is from Smithers. You can tell he loves this community and that it has become his escape from touring and the music industry. What’s more everyone around town seems to have immense respect for him because of his dedication to his family. I heard from more than several people that he can often be seen playing outside with his kids. Read more: http://bit.ly/2kGvjiC

Unreal views on and off Hudson Bay Mountain

I had the pleasure of teaming up with talented videographer Chris Wheeler for a sunrise photo and video shoot at Hudson Bay Mountain in Smithers. It’s an experience I’ll never forget – for a number of reasons. It was my first snow cat ride. It was pitch black and we were on the side of a mountain. And the other was that we didn’t have matches or a lighter to spark up the wood stove in our cabin. But that was OK. We huddled in and talked, thankful to see the first golden rays of morning as we headed out for the first tracks shoot. We watched the sun come up and then skied down the mountain. What an exhilarating start the day with no one else around us. I bet you could hear us whooping it up for miles getting to experience this amazing alpine experience. Read more: http://bit.ly/2kGvjiC

 

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2kGvjiC

 

For more information on our journey visit: http://bit.ly/2lAOb2l and follow the expedition on my Instagram and Facebook pages! x

Partners: SnowSeekers – Tourism Northern BC

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook Page

SkiNorthBC: Shames Mountain

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Brad Zeerip and others are happy to share with anyone who wants to come along for the ride

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Shames Mountain is a little bit different than most ski hills you’ve skied in your life. It certainly was for me. Unlike most places where people strap on their boards for a whooping good time, Shames is actually owned by the people of the town. It was built on a co-operative model, is and non-profit and exists to provide recreational activities to the people in and around the Shames Mountain Ski Area. It’s claim to fame – outside the awesome snow – is that it was Canada’s first co-operative ski resort. Enjoy incredible, untouched, powder while visiting Shames Mountain… So, it’s no surprise people here LOVE their ski hill. Because they own it.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2l8xoqt

Meet Brad Zeerip, Northern B.C.’s Biggest Skier.

“This is paradise on earth,” Brad Zeerip tells me when I first meet him at Shames Mountain. This is Zeerip’s gigantic playground and one he’ll gladly share with new visitors like me and make just about anyone feel welcome who comes to his hometown – or his home. Read more: http://bit.ly/2l8xoqt

Skiing untouched pure pow

Now I know what they mean by Champagne powder. I found it and quenched by thirst for big, dry, fluffy snow at Shames. I blissfully carved wave after wave of undisturbed, white goodness. We felt like we had the place to ourselves, even though the mountain was busy with people. On paper, this mountain looks like a small ski resort with just 130 acres of terrain, 18 runs, one fixed-grip chairlift and one t-bar. But this hill skis like a big mountain. Read more: http://bit.ly/2l8xoqt

Powder to the people of Shames

When you mix a love for the outdoors with like-minded people you create a village. These are the friends and faces I saw on the hill and in the lodge. It was clear everyone is here for the snow and in the process, it brings people together. Read more: http://bit.ly/2l8xoqt

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2l8xoqt

 

For more information on our journey visit: http://bit.ly/2lAOb2l and follow the expedition on my Instagram and Facebook pages! x

Partners: SnowSeekers – Tourism Northern BC

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook Page

SkiNorthBC: 72 Hours in Terrace

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Diving into Northern B.C.’s snow-loving culture

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Our SkiNorthBC Expedition kicked off in Terrace, B.C. But before I even landed, I got some insights into the place I was about to visit, because my seat mate on the plane was a Terrace local. As soon as I told him it was my first time there, he lit up and began to tell me all the things I needed to see and experience. His stories got me pumped to find out more about this small city of about 13,000 people nestled along the Skeena River in the Cariboo Region. As we landed he pointed out his below and I could tell the immense pride he had about his hometown. Embrace winter in the North. Plan your trip to Terrace… I was ready for my Northern B.C. adventure to begin.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2l47h4g

Learn about the Kitselas Nation at Kitselas Canyon

Long before this area was known for its recreational opportunities, it was home to the Kitselas people, a tribe of the Tsimshian Nation, who’ve lived in the area for thousands of years. I wanted to find out more meet some people from the community. Read more: http://bit.ly/2l47h4g

My first time cross-country skiing

It didn’t take long to learn that Terrace is a haven for outdoor activities and one of the favorite things to do is clipping on those skinny boards and cross-country skiing. Read more: http://bit.ly/2l47h4gStay at Skeena River House B&B

The minute I walked into Skeena River House, I felt at home. That’s probably because it is the family home of the couple who own and operate it. Their down to earth manner and welcoming smiles felt as warm as the fire crackling in the corner. Read more: http://bit.ly/2l47h4gShames Mountain: Deep. Fluffy. Snow.

I had no idea what a treat I was in for when I got to Shames Mountain. Deep. Fluffy. Snow. That’s what greeted us on our trip to this community hub about 35 km outside of Terrace. Read more: http://bit.ly/2l47h4g

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/2l47h4g

 

For more information on our journey visit: http://bit.ly/2lAOb2l and follow the expedition on my Instagram and Facebook pages! x

Partners: SnowSeekers – Tourism Northern BC

 

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook Page

SkiNorthBC Expedition

By EXPEDITION No Comments

The purpose of our #SkiNorthBC Expedition is to open eyes and ears around the experiences and the people who will welcome you into the winter wilds of northern BC.

 

Our journey across Northern BC is now complete and my articles and photos are now up on my blog. You can check out the stories below:

 

Read the Stories:

72 Hours in Quesnel with Dax Justin

Troll Resort steals my heart

72 Hours in Terrace with Dax Justin

Shames Mountain: A ski hill for the people 

72 Hours in Smithers with Dax Justin

Hudson Bay Mountain

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Today I set off on my 4th expedition! I’ve teamed up with Jim Barr (@doc_pow) of SnowSeekers and Chris Wheeler (@apreswheeler) to explore various regions for the next two weeks. I haven’t ventured very far into Northern BC so I couldn’t be more stoked!

For more information on our journey visit:  and follow the expedition on my Instagram and Facebook pages! x

Partners: SnowSeekers – Tourism Northern BC

Shames Mountain ResortKermodei Tourism SocietyRegional District of Kitimat-StikineNational Car RentalHonda Canada
Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
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Expedition: Badlands

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In the Summer of 2015 I set out across Southwest Alberta on a 7-day expedition across the Canadian Badlands. This is Indiana Jones X Dr. Alan Grant.

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Below is a gallery of my Badlands Expedition.

Expedition Gallery

This expedition opened my eyes to the rich historic culture of Alberta. I also learned that my home province of Alberta was built from one thing: Grit.

Thanks to my expedition partners Chinook Country Tourist Association.

Want to learn more about the Canadian Badlands? Visit Canadian Badlands Tourism.

Related Media:

Chinook Country wins Travel Alberta Alto Award in Marketing Partnership Category

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
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S14 Expedition – Alberta, Canada

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On August 4, 2014 I embarked on my first expedition, which was positioned to be around 7 days. People always ask how I began going on expeditions so I wanted to write about my first one. Turns out the S14 Expedition lasted around 20 days… This is the story of how it all happened.

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I was on Twitter one day and for the hell of it I tweeted @LincolnMotorCo and said “I want to go on a 7-day expedition across Alberta in one of your vehicles and document the journey across Instagram. Who can I talk to?” It was all super random and I just had the idea and acted on it. Turns out, a couple days later I woke up to an email from Ford Canada saying they wanted to partner on my expedition and collaborate. I then talked with Travel Alberta and they offered expedition support. Once I began aligning the expedition branding and started broadcasting that this was happening things started to move very quickly and I had a flood of emails from various adventure companies and ski resorts across Alberta. The entire thing was put together in a couple weeks and the backbone of the expedition was trying new things in the outdoors.

Expedition Gallery

I mentioned that the root of this expedition was trying new things in the outdoors. Here are the adventure activities that were new to me:

Huge thank you to all the support from Discover Banff Tours, local tourism and adventure companies, and to Ford Canada and Travel Alberta for making this happen.

Dax

As always, drop me a line and follow my adventures on:
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